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Sichuan and Qinghai birding report May-June 2017


SICHUAN and QINGHAI

 

17 May ¨C 7 June 2017

 

 

 

The very lovely and recently split Chinese Rubythroat at Balangshan.

 

 

Leaders: Kevin and Sissi from China Birding Tour. Trip organized by David Beadle

The Group: David Agro, Dennis Barry, David Brewer, George Bryant, Margaret Carney, Larry Hubble, Martin Schaefer, Bob Stamp, Martin Wiener

 

 

Diary of events:

Day 1. After a somewhat leisurely start and a rare hotel breakfast we headed for our first destination ¨C Longcanggou. We made a brief stop in some scrappy riverine habitat in order to kick the trip off with a few easy open country birds, including our first Yellow-­©\throated Bunting and Oriental Greenfinch etc. We arrived at our lodge just in time for lunch, which was excellent and set the tone for the whole trip. A quick stroll along the main road gave us a few more common birds, including White-­©\


browed Laughingthrush, Collared Finchbill and Large Hawk-­©\Cuckoo. After filling out forms in order to reclaim our delayed baggage we got into three vans for our first foray into the park. It was overcast and gloomy, but bird activity was quite good, especially for our very favorite group ¨C Phylloscopus warblers! After dinner some of us ventured out for a short while to try for owls. We were successful in hearing Himalayan Owl and Oriental Scops-­©\Owl rather distantly, but neither was responsive to playback.

Day 2. A pre-­©\dawn start enabled us to motor up to the upper reaches of the park, as far as the road would allow. We stopped here for breakfast, but it took a while to plough through since there were too many new birds to look at! The star bird here was Grey-­©\hooded Parrotbill, which we saw very well. A nice supporting cast included Vinaceous Rosefinch, Brown and Brownish-­©\flanked Bush-­©\Warblers and the         lovely Darjeeling Woodpecker. We birded our way down the road observing a good selection of birds, but the desired Three-­©\toed Parrotbill remained a distant heard-­©\ only. A nice surprise was a vocal and responsive Buffy Laughingthrush, which put on a great show for us. After lunch we headed for the lower section of the road. One of our main targets here was Emei Shan Warbler, which we eventually tracked down by its distinctive voice. Brown Dipper and a perched Grey-­©\faced Buzzard were also seen near the entrance gate.

 

The scarce endemic Grey-­©\hooded Parrotbill at Longcanggou.


Day 3. For our final morning here we again ventured higher to look for some species we had missed earlier. We were successful in seeing a pair of Emei Shan Liochiclas, the hulking Great Parrotbill, the ultra cute Golden Parrotbill and a female Lady Amherst¡¯s Pheasant for some. The rest of the day was spent in transit en route to Luding. A few brief roadside stops yielded a few common species, such as Ferruginous Duck, Little Grebe and various herons.

Day 4. Our single day at Erlangshan was hampered with rain and fog at higher altitudes, so we were forced to concentrate on mid and lower elevation forest. Early on we saw a couple of immature male Lady Amherst¡¯s Pheasants along the road, which was a good start! The well-­©\appointed breakfast stop yielded a pair of the highly desired Firethroat as well as many Eurasian Nutcrackers and a few lovely Grey-­©\headed Bullfinches. Higher up there were lots of Citrine Wagtails and Alpine Pipits, but little else was visible with the fog. Three Sharpe¡¯s Rosefinches provided a highlight for some members of the group and some noisy Chinese Babax were appreciated by all. Lunch in a small restaurant provided some respite from the drizzle and was enlivened with sightings of Chestnut Thrush and White-­©\browed Fulvetta. We drove down lower to escape the drizzle and spent some time studying the complexities of Phylloscopus warbler identification, with mixed success! The main highlight in the dry scrub at lower altitude was the understated endemic Rufous-­©\tailed Babbler, but another male Firethroat was a pleasant surprise.

Day 5. Much of the day was taken up with the drive from Luding to Wolong.

Day 6. Our first full morning here was spent birding around the tunnel, looking for pheasants. The weather was terrible, with near constant drizzle and fog making birding an uncomfortable business! Dark-­©\rumped and Chinese White-­©\browed Rosefinches were conspicuous, but the distant hillsides were largely shrouded in mist, making it difficult to see the pheasants. After some considerable effort one such hillside did yield both Chinese Monal and White Eared Pheasant and heard-­©\ only Koklas Pheasant, so the pressure was off a little bit¡­ for a while at least! We retreated to lower altitudes to escape the wetness and were rewarded with great views of Giant Laughingthrush amongst others. We then drove to the snowline for lunch, where we saw our first lovely Grandalas ¨C which was eventually voted bird of the trip! Nearby we notched up a pair of Snow Partridge, but the hoped-­©\for Red-­©\ fronted Rosefinch was a no-­©\show for us. Just below the pass we spent some times scanning the craggy cliffs and were eventually rewarded with great scope views of a pair of Tibetan Snowcocks. Other birds here included the fabulous Snow Pigeon and large flocks of Plain and Brandt¡¯s Mountain-­©\Finches. Lower still we encountered a few Pink-­©\rumped Rosefinches whilst looking for the elusive White-­©\browed Tit-­©\ Warblers. After an arduous day we were happy to retreat to our comfortable hotel for a hot shower and dinner!

Day 7. An early start saw us birding the forests below the tunnel, hoping to see more pheasants. However, apart from a Blood Pheasant spotted by our driver Mr. Wong, our considerable efforts met with little success. Sissi managed to find a pair of highly desirable Temminck¡¯s Tragopans, but they had departed before we got to


the site. A close calling Golden Pheasant likewise eluded us, but we did see a skulking Yellowish-­©\bellied Bush-­©\Warbler for our efforts! Our lunch stop allowed us to indulge in a nice vulture workshop (well, makes a change from our almost daily warbler workshops) with Himalayan Griffon, Cinereous Vulture and Lammergeier appearing in quick order, together with a couple of Golden Eagles. Other nice birds seen in the mid-­©\altitude forests included Himalayan Bluetail, Collared Grosbeak, Slaty-­©\backed Flycatcher and a nice catch-­©\up pair of Sharpe¡¯s Rosefinches for much of the group. Lower down we searched successfully for the lovely White-­©\tailed Rubythroat, obtaining great views of a gorgeous sing male ¨C a fitting end to the day.

Day 8. Much of the morning was devoted to the longish drive from Wolong to Maerkang with little time for lengthy birding stops. However, we did make a few short stops, adding some very nice birds along the way. Wallcreeper was very much the favorite bird, but we also saw some nice Hill Pigeons, a pair of Hodgson¡¯s Redstarts and a few Blue Rock Thrushes on the cliffs. Once we got to the pass above Mengbi Forest we stopped for lunch in glorious sunshine for once! Kessler¡¯s Thrush was much admired here and several Pink-­©\rumped Rosefinches showed well. In the pine forests lower down the road we admired more Blood Pheasants and the cute Rufous-­©\vented Tits at close range. A random riverside stop yielded our first Sichuan Tit as well as Himalayan Beautiful Rosefinch and White-­©\throated Dipper. A cultural stop and the very quaint village of Zhuokeji passed a very pleasant hour or so and added Oriental Turtle-­©\Dove to the list. We rolled into Maerkang late in the day and definitely ready for dinner!

Day 9. Early this morning we returned to Mengbi Forest, but the hoped-­©\for Chestnut-­©\throated Partridge remained a heard-­©\only. However, there was some compensation in the forms of Sichuan Jay, Przevalski¡¯s Nuthatch and the scarce Crimson-­©\browed Finch. Much of the afternoon was devoted to the long drive to the Tibetan Plateau. Late in the day as we neared Hongyuan we were delighted to score close views of the sought-­©\after Black-­©\necked Crane. Also here were our first Oriental Skylarks and Common Redshank.

Day 10. It was with great anticipation that we headed out from Hongyuan this morning, skirting the edge of the Tibetan Plateau. At our first stop we were more that happy to obtain great scope views of an impressive Eurasian Eagle-­©\Owl! There flocks of Twite and even a nice male Common Rosefinch in the general area. A few roadside stops yielded more new birds, including the characterful Ground Tit, a family party of four Chinese Grey Shrikes and a perched Little Owl. Around lunchtime we visited a small wetland that offered great views of some smart breeding plumage White-­©\winged Terns, lots of Kessler¡¯s Thrushes and a pair of Per David¡¯s (Plain) Laughingthrushes. By mid-­©\afternoon we had seen most of our target birds so we made haste to the recently discovered site for the enigmatic Przevalski¡¯s Pinktail. After some considerable searching we were drawing a blank. Saker Falcon, Upland Buzzard, Daurian Partridge and Common Stonechat were nice, but not so satisfying. However, after an hour or so it was noticed that the Dutch birders that had been shadowing us were also in the area and seen to be running for something!


Obviously the Pinktail ¨C so we raced over to the spot, which was not quite so easy at this altitude! As it turned out we were correct and there were four Pinktails in total. After a while we moved a bit closer and got some great views of these uncommon and charismatic birds ¨C very much a trip highlight. We rolled into Ruo¡¯ergai in good spirits!

 

The charismatic Przevalski¡¯s Pinktail is certainly one of the main attractions here.

 

Day 11. An early departure got us to Baxi Forest shortly after daybreak. It was cold, so there was not too much bird activity. However, it was nice to see many Black-­©\ eared Kites departing their roost. We could hear Chinese Grouse (our main target), but only managed to see more Blood Pheasants. Birding lower down the road we saw quite a nice variety of new birds, including Chinese Nuthatch, Godlewski¡¯s Bunting and a couple of confusing immature male Slaty-­©\backed Flycatchers. After lunch we were faced with rather a long drive to Chuanzhusi. We stopped a couple of times to look for White-­©\browed Tit-­©\Warbler in roadside scrub, but the birds would not show for everyone, unfortunately. Also here were Himalayan Beautiful Rosefinch and more Kessler¡¯s Thushes.

Day 12. Yet another early start got us to some nice forest below Gongangling Pass near Jiuzhaigou National Park. Unfortunately the Rockjumper group had got there before us, so we were not going to be first along the trail! Anyway, after a while we got word that the other group were watching a Sichuan Wood-­©\Owl, so we


gatecrashed the party! It was an amazing experience to watch this rare owl at such close range, and even calling! Luckily the Rockjumpers returned to the road after this thus allowing us to continue unchallenged. This was our final chance for Chinese Grouse, but it was not looking so great for us -­©\ the trail was pretty quiet.

However, on the return trudge uphill we stumbled across a fine pair of Chinese Grouse that we watched for some time as they foraged (along with a Long-­©\tailed Thrush) in an open area along the trail. However, we were still struggling to find Blue eared Pheasant so it was with relief that the irrepressible DAGRO spotted a pair foraging on a way distant hillside. They were so hideously distant that it took some time to get the whole group on the birds! The rain started again and it was time to leave. The drive to Tangjiahe was the most scenic of the whole trip and we were well impressed with the towering jagged peaks that surrounded us. We stopped just a couple of times, but managed to see a female Amur Falcon and Grey-­©\ headed Woodpecker at one productive spot. Just before reaching our accommodations within Tangjiahe Reserve we saw some Takin on a hillside near the entrance road ¨C a great way to end the day!

Day 13. In spite of the Rockjumper group staying at the same hotel it turned out that we were to be the first group along the trail this morning. This seemed like a good omen, but the day turned out to be somewhat less than satisfactory for many members of the group. The drive in was good for mammals with some nice sightings of Chinese Serow, Chinese Goral and Reeve¡¯s Muntjac. A brief Little Forktail that flushed from the road was missed by most. Once on the trail it was rather quiet apart from a furtive male Golden Pheasant and couple of flocks of White-­©\throated Laughingthrushes. We hurried along because we were late in spite of being the first group on the trail. A Temminck¡¯s Tragopan was heard, but not visible, unfortunately. A little higher a pair of Slaty Buntings was found, but missed by those at the back.

Higher still a superb male Tragopan was seen for extended views, but was only seen by those at the back! If one was in the middle you simply couldn¡¯t win it seemed! At the highest point the small patches of bamboo yielded none of the desired parrotbills, but by this time it was rather hot and sunny. Other birds seen by some included Spotted Laughingthrush, White-­©\browed Bush-­©\Robins and some heard-­©\only Brown Parrotbills. Some of us elected to carry on birding through the heat of the day whilst most opted for a short break back at the hotel. A speckled Piculet was meager compensation for those who battled the heat! The late afternoon session was rather quiet. We tried for the Tawny Fish Owl at its regular spot, but it seemed to be long gone. A tip from some locals saw us leave the park to look elsewhere along the river. We were just about to turn back when Sissi, amazingly, spotted the owl fly in and land on a concrete jetty at close range. With all the commotion of exiting the bus the owl spooked and flew to the far side of the river, though still offering great scope views ¨C what a bird! In spite of it being a frustrating day all was (almost) forgiven.

Day 14. Before our long drive back to Chengdu we had a few hours to explore the roads near the hotel. It was very quiet in spite of promising overcast conditions. The undoubted highlight was another male Golden Pheasant, which was a nice catch-­©\up for those who have missed it the day before. We were just a few minutes into our


journey when a loud voice from the back of the bus cried ¡°BEAR, BEAR, BEAR ¨C STOP!¡± It was, of course DAGRO¡­ and there was indeed a bear ¨C a magnificent Asiatic Black Bear clambering up the rocky slope on the other side of the river. Out came the scopes and great views were had of this rarely encountered animal ¨C a great sighting indeed. Otherwise it was pretty standard fare. The long drive was rather uneventful, other than a pair of Long-­©\billed Plovers at our riverside lunch stop and a somewhat out of range Ashy Minivet at a gas station stop. It was with some sadness that we had to say goodbye to Martin this evening whose great birding knowledge and easy humor would be greatly missed.

Day 15. An early flight to Xining in the province of Qinghai got us to our very plush hotel by mid-­©\morning. Our first (and only) Great Spotted Woodpecker was spotted from the lobby window! After a quick re-­©\grouping we were ready to hit the road to reach an area of mixed pine forest and scrub at Yao Xigou. First we stopped for lunch, where we birded the scrub and plantations whilst the food was being prepared. We obtained some great looks at singing male Siberian Rubythroats here as well as many Azure-­©\winged Magpies and a few Oriental Turtle Doves, Hume¡¯s Warblers and Black-­©\faced Buntings. Yao Xigou itself delivered its main prize ¨C Gansu Leaf Warbler ¨C rather quickly, so we could relax and enjoy the birding. There was an abundance of Hume¡¯s Warblers here, as well as such nice birds as White-­©\bellied and White-­©\throated Redstarts, White-­©\cheeked and Chinese Nuthatches, Grey-­©\headed Bullfinch and many others. By late afternoon it was pretty quiet, so we headed back to the hotel for dinner.

Day 16. After the usual early departure we drove a relatively short distance to an area of terraced fields in the dry hill country to the north of Xining. Upon arrival one of our main targets was calling loudly and it didn¡¯t take too long to spot the Chukar on a nearby ridge. The other target, Daurian Partridge, took longer to find, but persistence usually pays off and four were eventually located in the general area, thought the views were not the greatest. Other birds here included several Godlewski¡¯s and Meadow Buntings and a handful of Pied Weatears. We returned to our hotel for breakfast, packed and were quickly on the road again heading for Qinghai Lake. We tried to stop for Mongolian Lark on the way, but the weather had become appalling with rain and near gale force winds making birding an unpleasant experience! We motored onwards to the lake, stopping for lunch beforehand. A  small wetland adjacent to the lake yielded many new birds for the trip and a myriad of waterfowl included lots of Greylag and Bar-­©\headed Geese, Red-­©\crested and Common Pochard, Ferruginous Duck and singles of Mallard and Tufted Duck. All very exciting! There were lots of tibetana Common terns here as well as a few White-­©\winged and Whiskered Terns in smart breeding plumage. A flyby Greater Painted Snipe was a surprise, but otherwise shorebirds were scarce. Hume¡¯s and Horned Larks were fairly common and a Rock Sparrow put in a brief appearance. As we drove parallel to the south shore a few Pallas¡¯s Gulls were found, resplendent in breeding finery. We arrived at our bustling, well-­©\appointed lakeside hotel in time for dinner.


Day 17. We backtracked a bit this morning and then continued our journey west. First stop was some roadside scrub in the rubber mountains were we would have put in time to search for Pink-­©\tailed Bunting had we not already seen them in Sichuan. The area yielded nice looks at Robin Accentor and a few Water Pipits, but little else new. We made another stop (in the rain again!) where we successfully found the desired Plain-­©\backed Snowfinch, but it took a while to get everyone on the bird and obtain a few photos. We continued on the pass where White-­©\winged, Rufous-­©\necked and White-­©\rumped Snowfinches gave great views. Several massive Tibetan Larks also allowed close approach. Our main target here was the impressive White-­©\winged Redstart, a male of which eventually gave itself up ¨C what a bird!

After all this excitement we descended into the cold deserts near Chaka. Our first stop was quite productive and it didn¡¯t take too long before we were seeing small flocks of the highly desired Pallas¡¯s Sandgrouse flying around. We walked a long way through this sparse habitat hoping for Mongolian Gound-­©\Jay, but none were forthcoming. Instead we found more Plain-­©\backed Snowfinches, lots of displaying Isabelline Wheatears and a couple of pairs of Lesser Sand Plovers that were obviously nesting in the area. A real highlight came as we trudged back to the bus when a female Pallas¡¯s Sandgrouse flushed off its nest, revealing three eggs in a gravelly nest! A couple more stops also drew a blank on the Ground-­©\Jay, but we did see two Northern Lapwings and displaying Asian Short-­©\toed ans Tibetan Larks.

Day 18. First stop this morning was close to where we had seen the sandgrouse. It was freezing cold, but wonderfully atmospheric with hazy snow-­©\covered mountains surrounding us. It was pretty quiet other than a few displaying Isabelline Wheatears and we were beginning to give up hope, but suddenly a Mongolian Ground-­©\Jay appeared atop a fence post some distance away ¨C what a relief! After a slow approach we managed to get rather close to this stunning bird and were able to obtain some great scope views and photos. Then, in quick order we added the terrific Mongolian Lark and diminutive (though decidedly tubby) Per David¡¯s Snowfinch to the list. Turned out to be a great morning! The rest of the day was taken up with the long drive back to Xining. We skirted the north edge of Qinghai Lake this time, obtaining great views of Tibetan Fox along the way. Our lunch stop revealed nesting Twite in the small pines in front! As we continued we made a strategic stop (in the rain again by this stage) in order to see the critically endangered Przevalski¡¯s Gazelle. It was a sad and sorry sight to see these rare animals (maybe 3-­©\400 remain) cooped up with the local sheep behind fences. Also along the river here were a pair of Common Mergansers. Our final stop was at the east end of Qinghai Lake where large sand dunes and low shrubbery create a unique habitat. It took a little while, but we were eventually successful in finding a singing Brown Accentor. Also here were several Greater Short-­©\toed Larks and three Chinese Grey Shrikes. All in all not too bad for a travel day!

Day 19. This was a travel day that was mostly taken up with our flight from Xining back to Chengdu.


Day 20. Most of us opted to spend the day in Chengdu ¨C first at the Panda Center followed by the Sichuan Museum after lunch. The Panda Center was very good, but rather busy with local tourists after about ten in the morning. In fact ¡°packed¡± would be the word! There were a few common birds there that offered some nice photo ops. The Museum is definitely worth a short visit if one has the time. The art and calligraphy exhibits are particularly recommended. A nearby park has a nice heronry, but offered little else in the way of new birds, House Swifts excepted.

Day 21. A travel day as we departed Chengdu homeward bound for Toronto, via Beijing.

 

 

A male Grey-­©\headed Bullfinch, just one of the superb inhabitants of the Sichuan forests¡­

 

Bird species list:

 

 

ANSERIFORMES: Anatidae

 

Greylag Goose -­©\ Anser anser rubrirostris: At least 30 were seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Bar-­©\headed Goose -­©\ Anser indicus: At least 60 were seen at Qinghai Lake.


 

Ruddy Shelduck -­©\ Tadorna ferruginea: Commonly seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hong yuan and Rouergai. A few were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai at least 30 were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

Gadwall -­©\ Anas strepera strepera: One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. In Qinghai two was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Mallard -­©\ Anas platyrhynchos platyrhynchos: In Qinghai a male was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Eastern Spot-­©\billed Duck -­©\ Anas zonorhyncha: One seen in a local park in central Chengdu was probably of dubious origin!

 

Red-­©\crested Pochard -­©\ Netta rufina: In Qinghai at least 250 was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Common Pochard ¨C Aythya ferina: In Qinghai about 40 was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Ferruginous Duck -­©\ Aythya nyroca: One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. In Qinghai three were seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Tufted Duck ¨C Aythya fuligula: In Qinghai a male was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Common (Eurasian) Merganser -­©\ Mergus merganser orientalis: In Qinghai a pair was seen near the north shore of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

GALLIFORMES: Phasianidae

 

Chukar ¨C Alectoris chukar: In Qinghai a vocal bird was seen at Beishan near Xining.

 

Tibetan Snowcock -­©\ Tetraogallus tibetanus henrici: We had great scope views of a pair high up on a rocky hillside below Balangshan Pass.

 

Chinese Bamboo Partridge -­©\ Bambusicola thoracicus: A roadside individual offered great looks at Tangjiahe.

 

Blood Pheasant -­©\ Ithaginis cruentus berezowskii: One was seen from the bus at Balangshan. At least six were seen below the pass at Mengbishan. Four were seen well at Baxi Forest.

 

Chinese Monal -­©\ Lophophorus lhuysii: Two individuals were scoped high on a hillside near the tunnel at Balangshan. Endemic. Vulnerable.


 

Snow Partridge -­©\ Lerwa lerwa: In spite of the truly awful weather a pair offered nice scope views below Balangshan Pass.

 

Verreaux¡¯s Partridge -­©\ Tetraophasis obscurus: Heard distantly from the tunnel at Balangshan. Heard also at Mengbishan, quite close at times, but always out of reach. Endemic

 

Temminck¡¯s Tragopan -­©\ Tragopan temminckii: One was heard at Longcanggou. Sissi had the good fortune to see two at Balangshan. And Sissi struck again at Tangjiahe, where she and a few lucky members of the group enjoyed fabulous views of a stunning male (and more cryptic female) along the main trail. The rest of us were feeling distinctly gripped¡­

 

 

The glorious male Temminck¡¯s Tragopan that most of us never saw! Photo by Larry Hubble.

 

Golden Pheasant -­©\ Chrysolophus pictus: Heard a few times (one rather close) at Balangshan. Two tastefully gaudy males were seen at Tangjiahe. Endemic

 

Lady Amherst¡¯s Pheasant -­©\ Chrysolophus amherstiae: Just a single female was seen at Longcanggou. Two immature males were noted from the bus at Erlangshan.


Ring-­©\necked Pheasant -­©\ Phasianus colchicus: Heard only at Erlangshan. Several were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai this bird was frequently heard or seen at several sites.

White Eared-­©\Pheasant -­©\ Crossoptilon crossoptilon: Three were scoped high up on the hillside above the tunnel at Balangshan. Another four were seen at Mengbishan. Near-­©\threatened.

 

Blue Eared-­©\Pheasant -­©\ Crossoptilon auritum: It was a last minute save, but the two birds on a distant hillside at Gonggangling Forest near Jiuzhaigou were gratefully accepted. Endemic

 

Daurian Partridge ¨C Perdix daurica: In Qinghai four were seen at Beishan near Xining.

 

Koklass Pheasant -­©\ Pucrasia macrolopha ruficollis: Heard only at the tunnel at Balangshan.

 

Severtzov¡¯s (Chinese) Grouse -­©\ Bonasa sewerzowi: Heard at Baxi Forest. We were fortunate to have prolonged looks at a confiding pair at Gonggangling Forest.

Endemic. Near-­©\threatened.

 

PODICIPEDIFORMES: Podicipedidae

Little Grebe -­©\ Tachybaptus ruficollis poggei: One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. In Qinghai one was seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

Great Crested Grebe -­©\ Podiceps cristatus cristatus: In Qinghai at least 250 was seen at Qinghai Lake. It was interesting to see this species nesting colonially.

 

Eared (Black-­©\necked) Grebe -­©\ Podiceps nigricollis nigricollis: In Qinghai 30 was logged at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

CICONIIFORMES: Ciconiidae

 

Black Stork -­©\ Ciconia nigra: Two were seen in flight between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

 

PELECANIFORMES: Ardeidae

 

Grey Heron -­©\ Ardea cinerea jouyi: One was seen north of Chengdu. Good numbers were seen at a heronry in a local park in central Chengdu.

 

Little Egret -­©\ Egretta garzetta garzetta: A few were seen whilst en route to


Longcanggou and whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Commonly seen whilst en route to Chengdu. A few were seen along the river near our hotel in central Chengdu and good numbers were seen at a heronry in a local park in central Chengdu.

 

(Eastern) Cattle Egret -­©\ Bubulcus ibis coromandus: Two were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong and three were seen on the Tibetan Plateau.

 

Chinese Pond Heron -­©\ Ardeola bacchus: A breeding-­©\plumaged bird was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. A rather sorry looking individual was seen resting in the snow below the pass at Balangshan. Otherwise, frequently seen along roadsides during travel days. A few were seen along the river near our hotel in central Chengdu.

 

Black-­©\crowned Night Heron ¨C Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax: One was seen whilst en route to Chengdu. Qinghai. A few were seen along the river near our hotel in central Chengdu and good numbers were seen at a heronry in a local park in central Chengdu.

 

 

PELECANIFORMES: Threskiornthidae

 

Eurasian Spoonbill -­©\ Platalea leucorodia: In Qinghai two immature birds were seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

ACCIPITRIFORMES: Accipitridae

 

Lammergeier -­©\ Gypaetus barbatus aureus: Four were seen at Balangshan and two flew over us at the pass at Mengbishan. Near-­©\threatened.

 

Oriental Honey-­©\buzzard -­©\ Pernis ptilorhynchus orientalis: A total of five was seen at Longcanggou. One was noted at Balangshan.

 

Cinereous Vulture -­©\ Aegypius monachus: We were lucky to obtain great looks as one flew right over us in low flight at Balangshan. Near-­©\threatened.

 

Himalayan Griffon -­©\ Gyps himalayensis: At least eight were seen at Balangshan. Small numbers were seen at Mengbishan. In Qinghai small numbers were seen at various points around Qinghai Lake. Near-­©\threatened.

 

Golden Eagle -­©\ Aquila chrysaetos daphanea: Two were seen at Balangshan and a single bird was seen at Mengbishan.

 

Grey-­©\faced Buzzard -­©\ Butastur indicus: We had nice scope views of a perched bird at Longcanggou.


Eurasian Sparrowhawk -­©\ Accipiter nisus melaschistos: One (probably a large female) was seen in flight at Mengbishan. In Qinghai one was seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Northern Goshawk -­©\ Accipiter gentilis schvedowi: An adult was seen amazingly well at Mengbishan.

 

Black-­©\eared Kite -­©\ Milvus lineatus: Singles were seen near Chengdu and at Mengbishan. At least 25 were on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. About 40 were seen leaving their roost at Baxi Forest.

 

Himalayan Buzzard -­©\ Buteo burmanicus: One was seen at Balangshan.

 

Upland Buzzard -­©\ Buteo hemilasius: Two singles were seen at Mengbishan. Four were seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. Two were seen near Baxi Forest. In Qinghai three singles were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

 

GRUIFORMES: Rallidae

 

Eurasian Moorhen ¨C Gallinula chloropus: An adult with a juvenile were seen at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

Eurasian Coot -­©\ Fulica atra: Two were seen at a wetland between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai good numbers were seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

GRUIFORMES: Gruidae

 

Black-­©\necked Crane -­©\ Grus nigricollis: 19 were counted near Hongyuan and nine were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai just one pair was seen at the north shore of Qinghai Lake. Vulnerable.

 

 

CHARADRIIFORMES: Charadriidae

 

Northern Lapwing ¨C Vanellus vanellus: In Qinghai two (including a displaying bird) were seen near Chaka.

 

Lesser (Mongolian) Sand-­©\Plover -­©\ Charadrius mongolus: In Qinghai five Obviously nesting birds) were seen near Chaka and a pair was seen near the north shore of Qinghai Lake.

 

Kentish Plover ¨C Charadrius alexandrius alexandrius: In Qinghai five (including one with young) were seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Long-­©\billed Plover ¨C Charadrius placidus: Two were seen on a riverbank at our


lunch stop as we traveled from Tangjiahe to Chengdu.

 

 

CHARADRIIFORMES: Rostratulidae

 

Greater Painted-­©\Snipe ¨C Rostratula benghalensis: In Qinghai one seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake was quite a surprise.

 

 

CHARADRIIFORMES: Scolopacidae

 

Common Sandpiper -­©\ Actitis hypoleucos: In Qinghai one was seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

Common Redshank -­©\ Tringa tetanus eurhina: A few were seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai a few were seen at Qinghai Lake and around Chaka.

 

 

CHARADRIIFORMES: Laridae

 

Black-­©\headed Gull -­©\ Chroicocephalus ridibundus: In Qinghai three were seen at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Brown-­©\headed Gull -­©\ Chroicocephalus brunnicephalus: Five were seen near Hongyuan. A few were noted between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai a few were seen at various points around Qinghai Lake.

 

Pallas¡¯s Gull -­©\ Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus: In Qinghai at least 12 adults in superb breeding plumage were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

Common Tern -­©\ Sterna hirundo tibetana: One was seen near Hongyuan. A few were seen very well between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. One was seen near Baxi Forest. In Qinghai good numbers were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

White-­©\winged Tern ¨C Chlidonias leucoptera: A few were seen on the Tibetan Plateau. In Qinghai two was seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Whiskered Tern ¨C Chlidonias hybrid hybrida: In Qinghai at least four was seen at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

PTEROCLIFORMES: Pteroclidae

 

Pallas¡¯s Sandgrouse ¨C Syrrhaptes paradoxus: In Qinghai at least 20 was logged near Chaka. This included a female flushed from her nest (containing three eggs) at close quarters.


 

 

COLUMBIFORMES: Columbidae

 

Rock Pigeon -­©\ Columba livia: Introduced. Frequently seen around human habitations in the lowlands. In Qinghai three seen at Beishan near Xining and five near Chaka may have been of wild stock.

 

Hill Pigeon -­©\ Columba rupestris: We had great looks at several birds at the Wallcreeper site near Wori. In Qinghai one was seen whilst en route to Qinghai Lake. Two were seen near Chaka.

 

Snow Pigeon -­©\ Columba leuconota gradaria: We had some nice looks at this attractive pigeon at Balangshan.

 

Speckled Wood-­©\pigeon -­©\ Columba: Up to seven were noted in flight at Longcanggou.

 

Oriental Turtle-­©\Dove -­©\ Streptopelia orientalis orientalis: Two were seen at. Three were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai a few were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Eurasian Collared-­©\Dove -­©\ Streptopelia decaocto decaocto: Small numbers were seen whilst in Qinghai.

 

Red Collared-­©\Dove -­©\ Streptopelia tranquebarica humilis: Three were seen at Erlangshan.

 

Spotted Dove -­©\ Spilopelia chinensis chinensis: A couple of birds were seen outside our hotel in Chengdu. Four were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong.

 

 

CUCULIFORMES: Cuculidae

 

Asian Koel -­©\ Eudynamys scolopaceus chinensis: Heard and seen at Longcanggou. A migrant was seen below the pass at Balangshan. Heard at Tangjiahe a couple of times. Heard also at the Chengdu Panda Center.

Large Hawk-­©\Cuckoo -­©\ Hierococcyx sparverioides: Commonly heard (with one seen) at Longcanggou, Erlangshan and Tangjiahe.

 

Lesser Cuckoo -­©\ Cuculus poliocephalus: Frequently heard around Longcanggou and at Tangjiahe. One was seen below the pass at Balangshan.

 

Himalayan Cuckoo -­©\ Cuculus saturates: at Tangjiahe. A few were heard at Longcanggou, Erlangshan. One was seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. Heard, and seen once, at Tangjiahe.


Common Cuckoo -­©\ Cuculus canorus bakeri: A few were heard or seen at Longcanggou, Erlangshan, Balangshan, Mengbishan, Baxi Forest and at Tangjiahe. In Qinghai a few were seen or heard at Yao Xigou. Two or more were seen at Beishan near Xining.

 

 

STRIGIFORMES: Strigidae

 

Oriental Scops-­©\Owl ¨C Otus sunia: Heard rather distantly from our hotel near Longcanggou.

 

Eurasian Eagle-­©\Owl -­©\ Bubo bubo tibetanus: We enjoyed nice scope views of a roosting individual at a quarry north of Hongyuan.

 

Tawny Fish Owl -­©\ Ketupa flavipes: We were treated to great looks at Tangjiahe. It was a great relief to see this almost mythical owl, especially since it had not been reliable of late.

 

Little Owl -­©\ Athene noctua ludlowi: One was seen perched atop a telegraph pole between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

Himalayan Owl -­©\ Strix nivicolum: Heard rather distantly from our hotel near Longcanggou.

 

Pere David¡¯s Owl -­©\ Strix davidi: We were delighted to have walk-­©\away views of a very vocal bird at Gongangling Forest. This was an undoubted trip highlight.

Endemic

 

 

CAPRIMULGIFORMES: Apodidae

 

White-­©\throated Needletail -­©\ Hirundapus caudacutus nudipes: We had great looks at up to 25 birds high up at Longcanggou.

 

Himalayan Swiftlet -­©\ Aerodramus brevirostris innominatus: Small numbers were seen in the Longcanggou area. Ten were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong.

 

Salim Ali¡¯s Swift -­©\ Apus salimalii: Two, presumably of this species, whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. A flock of about 20 was seen at Balangshan. Eight were seen at the Wallcreeper site at Wori and good numbers were seen at Tangjiahe. In Qinghai a few were seen near Xining. Regional endemic.

 

House Swift -­©\ Apus nipalensis: At least four were seen at a local park in central Chengdu.


 

BUCEROTIFORMES: Upupidae

 

Eurasian Hoopoe -­©\ Upupa epops epops: Three were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

 

CORACIIFORMES: Alcedinidae

 

Common Kingfisher -­©\ Alcedo atthis bengalensis: One was seen near Tangjiahe.

 

Black-­©\capped Kingfisher ¨C Halcyon pileata: single birds were seen at Longcanggou and ¡­

 

Crested Kingfisher -­©\ Megaceryle lugubris guttulata: A few were seen along the rivers at Tangjiahe. In Qinghai two were seen north of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

PICIFORMES: Picidae

 

Speckled Piculet ¨C Picumnus innominatus chinensis: One was seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Grey-­©\capped Woodpecker -­©\ Dendrocopos canicapillus scintilliceps: Three were noted at Tangjiahe. Another was seen during our lunch stop as we traveled from Tangjiahe to Chengdu.

 

Crimson-­©\breasted Woodpecker -­©\ Dendrocopos cathpharius pernyii: One was seen at Longcanggou.

 

Darjeeling Woodpecker -­©\ Dendrocopos darjellensis: Two were noted at Longcanggou.

 

White-­©\backed Woodpecker -­©\ Dendrocopos leucotos tangi: We were surprised to see a male at Longcanggou. This form appears to have much reduced white on the wing coverts and lower back as well as extensive black streaking on the sides of the breast.

 

Great Spotted Woodpecker -­©\ Dendrocopos major: In Qinghai one was seen in the grounds of our hotel in Xining.

 

Black Woodpecker -­©\ Dryocopus martius khamensis: Heard only at Mengbishan.

 

Grey-­©\headed Woodpecker -­©\ Picus canus: One was seen at one of our stops as we traveled to Tangjiahe. In Qinghai one was seen at Beishan near Xining.


FALCONIFORMES: Falconidae

 

Eurasian (Common) Kestrel -­©\ Falco tinnunculus interstinctus: Single birds were seen t Balangshan. Ruoergai and Hongyuan.

 

Amur Falcon -­©\ Falco amurensis: A female was seen perched on roadside wires whilst en route to Tangjiahe.

 

Eurasian Hobby -­©\ Falco subbuteo: One was seen quite well at Mengbishan. Another was seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. to Tangjiahe.

 

Saker Falcon -­©\ Falco cherrug: Three were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. See note. Endangered.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Campephagidae

 

Short-­©\billed Minivet -­©\ Pericrocotus brevirostris affinis: A few were seen in Sichuan.

 

Long-­©\tailed Minivet -­©\ Pericrocotus ethologus Small numbers were seen at most upland sites.

 

Ashy Minivet -­©\ Pericrocotus divaricarus: One was seen whilst en route to Tangjiahe.

 

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Laniidae

 

Brown Shrike -­©\ Lanius cristatus confusus: Four were seen at Longcanggou. A single bird was seen at Erlangshan. Two were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. A few were seen whilst en route from.

 

Long-­©\tailed Shrike -­©\ Lanius schach: An adult and juvenile were seen in the grounds of the Sichuan Museum in central Chengdu.

 

Grey-­©\backed Shrike -­©\ Lanius tephronotus tephronotus: A few were noted around Longcanggou. Singles were seen at Erlangshan and whilst en route from Luding to Wolong and a few were noted at Balangshan. In Qinghai one was seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Chinese Grey Shrike -­©\ Lanius sphenocercus giganteus: Three juveniles and an adult were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai three were seen at the sand dunes at the eastern end of Qinghai Lake.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Oriolidae


Black-­©\naped Oriole -­©\ Oriolus chinensis diffusus: About six were seen around our hotel near Longcanggou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Dicruridae

 

Black Drongo -­©\ Dicrurus macrocercus cathoecus: Small numbers were seen along roadsides. A single bird was seen higher up at Balangshan.

 

Ashy Drongo -­©\ Dicrurus leucocepheus: Two flew overhead at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Corvidae

 

Sichuan Jay -­©\ Perisoreus internigrans: After some effort three singles were eventually seen at Mengbishan. Endemic. Vulnerable.

 

Eurasian Jay -­©\ Garrulus glandarius sinensis: A few were seen at Longcanggou.

 

Azure-­©\winged Magpie -­©\ Cyanopica cyanus swinhoei: Several birds offered nice views north of Hongyuan. In Qinghai a few were seen near Yao Xigou.

 

Red-­©\billed Blue-­©\Magpie -­©\ Urocissa erythroryncha erythroryncha: Commonly seen at several sites, including Longcanggou, near Luding and at Tangjiahe.

 

Eurasian Magpie -­©\ Pica pica bottanensis: Small numbers were seen at scattered sites in Sichuan and Qinghai.

 

Mongolian Ground-­©\Jay ¨C Podoces hendersoni: In Qinghai we eventually (after some considerable effort) obtained terrific views of a vocal bird near Chaka.

 

Eurasian (Spotted) Nutcracker -­©\ Nucifraga caryocatactes macella: Impressive numbers (at least 30) were noted at Erlangshan. Two were seen higher up at Tangjiahe.

 

Red-­©\billed Chough -­©\ Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax himalayanus: A few were seen at Balangshan and near Mengbishan. In Qinghai two were seen at Yao Xigou. Three were seen at Beishan near Xining.

 

Yellow-­©\billed (Alpine) Chough -­©\ Pyrrhocorax graculus forsythi: Good numbers were seen around Balangshan. Four were noted near Mengbishan.

 

Daurian Jackdaw -­©\ Coloeus dauuricus: A couple of individuals were seen near Hongyuan and two were seen near Baxi Forest.


Carrion (Oriental) Crow -­©\ Corvus [corone] orientalis: A few were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai a few were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Large-­©\billed Crow -­©\ Corvus macrorhynchos tibetosinensis: A single bird was noted at Longcanggou. Three were noted at Erlangshan. Four were seen at Mengbishan.

Small numbers were noted at Tangjiahe. In Qinghai a few were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Collared Crow -­©\ Corvus torquatus: Two or three were seen along the roadside as we traveled towards Tangjiahe.

 

 

This Collared Crow was a nice roadside bird¡­

 

Common (Northern) Raven -­©\ Corvus corax tibetanus: Three were seen at Mengbishan. Eight were logged between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Alaudidae

 

Horned Lark -­©\ Eremophila alpestris: One was seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai small numbers were seen at Qinghai Lake and found to be very common around Chaka.

 

Greater Short-­©\toed Lark ¨C Calandrella brachydactyla: In Qinghai at least 20 was


logged in the sand dunes at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Hume¡¯s Lark ¨C Calandrella acutirostris: In Qinghai a few were seen at Qinghai Lake and around Chaka.

 

Tibetan Lark -­©\ Melanocorypha maxima maxima: In Qinghai we had great looks at Qinghai Lake and at the Rubber Mountains pass. Two were seen at Chaka.

 

Mongolian Lark -­©\ Melanocorypha mongolica: In Qinghai we eventually had great views of two birds flighty near Chaka. This unique lark and was one of the trip highlights.

 

Asian Short-­©\toed Lark ¨C Alauda cheleensis: One was seen in song flight near Chaka.

 

Oriental Skylark -­©\ Alauda gulgula inopinata: Commonly seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai this lark was commonly seen around Qinghai Lake and around Chaka.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Hirundinidae

 

Sand Martin -­©\ Riparia riparia: One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. In Qinghai a few were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

Pale Sand Martin -­©\ Riparia diluta fohkienensis: A few were seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

Eurasian Crag-­©\Martin -­©\ Ptyonoprogne rupestris: At least 20 were seen at the Wallcreeper site at Wori. 25 were note near Tangjiahe.

 

Barn Swallow -­©\ Hirundo rustica gutturalis: Common -­©\ first seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong.

 

Red-­©\rumped Swallow -­©\ Cecropis daurica rufula: At least 20 were noted at Longcanggou. Four were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. A few were seen along the river near our hotel in central Chengdu.

 

Asian House-­©\Martin -­©\ Delichon dasypus cashmeriense: A few were seen not too far from Luding. About a dozen were noted whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Two were seen at Balangshan.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Stenostiridae

 

Grey-­©\headed Canary-­©\Flycatcher -­©\ Culicicapa ceylonensis calochrysea: Single birds were seen at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe.


 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Paridae

 

Fire-­©\capped Tit -­©\ Cephalopyrus flammiceps olivaceus: Up to three were seen at Longcanggou.

 

Yellow-­©\browed Tit -­©\ Sylviparus modestus modestus: Three were seen Longcanggou.

 

Coal Tit -­©\ Periparus ater eckodedicatus: A couple of vocal birds were seen at Longcanggou.

 

Rufous-­©\vented Tit -­©\ Periparus rubidiventris whistleri: Several of these lovely birds were seen at Mengbishan. One was seen at Baxi Forest. One was seen at Gonggangling Forest near Jiuzhaigou. In Qinghai four were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

 

The ultra cute Rufous-­©\vented Tit entertained us at several sites.

 

Yellow-­©\bellied Tit -­©\ Pardaliparus venustulus: Small numbers were seen at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe. Endemic.


Grey-­©\crested Tit -­©\ Lophophanes dichrous: A single bird was seen at Erlangshan. Two were noted at Mengbishan.

 

Willow (Songar) Tit -­©\ Poecile montanus affinis: In Qinghai three were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Sichuan Tit -­©\ Poecile weigoldicus: We enjoyed great views of a single individual as we traveled towards Hongyuan. Two were seen in scrub north of Hongyuan. Three were seen at Baxi Forest.

 

Ground Tit -­©\ Pseudopodoces humilis: A few were seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

Green-­©\backed Tit -­©\ Parus monticolus yunnanensis: A few vocal birds were seen at Longcanggou. Two were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Commonly seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Japanese Tit -­©\ Parus minor tibetanus: One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Two were seen north of Hongyuan. A few were noted as we traveled between Tangjiahe and Chengdu. In Qinghai two were seen near Yao Xigou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Aegithalidae

 

White-­©\browed Tit-­©\Warbler -­©\ Leptopoecile sophiae obscurus: Three were seen in scrub near Baxi Forest.

 

Black-­©\throated Tit -­©\ Aegithalos concinnus: A flock of six was seen briefly at our hotel near Longcanggou and at least 10 noisy birds were seen at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Sittidae

 

Eurasian Nuthatch -­©\ Sitta europaea sinensis: One was seen at Longcanggou.

 

Chestnut-­©\vented Nuthatch -­©\ Sitta nagaensis montium: Commonly seen at Longcanggou. Two were seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Przevalski¡¯s Nuthatch -­©\ Sitta przewalskii: A single bird was seen rather distantly at Mengbishan. In Qinghai a single bird showed well at Yao Xigou.

 

Snowy-­©\browed (Chinese) Nuthatch -­©\ Sitta villosa bangsi: One was seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai one was seen briefly at Yao Xigou.


 

PASSERIFORMES: Tichodromidae

 

Wallcreeper -­©\ Tichodroma muraria nepalensis: We had wonderful looks at a pair on the roadside cliffs at Wori.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Certhiidae

 

Hodgson¡¯s Treecreeper -­©\ Certhia hodgsoni khamensis: We had nice looks at one at Longcanggou. Two were seen at Mengbishan. One was seen and heard at Gongangling Forest near Jiuzhaigou.

 

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Troglodytidae

 

Eurasian Wren -­©\ Troglodytes troglodytes idius: Heard and seen at Longcanggou. Heard only at Gongangling Forest. In Qinghai one was heard at Yao Xigou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Cinclidae

 

White-­©\throated Dipper -­©\ Cinclus cinclus przewalskii: Heard at Mengbishan. One was seen as we traveled towards Hongyuan.

 

Brown Dipper -­©\ Cinclus pallasii przewalskii: One was seen below the gate at Longcanggou. Several were seen along the rivers at Tangjiahe.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Pycnonotidae

 

Collared Finchbill -­©\ Spizixos semitorques semitorques: Two were seen at Longcanggou and small numbers were noted at Tangjiahe.

 

Brown-­©\breasted Bulbul -­©\ Pycnonotus xanthorrhous andersoni: Two were seen whilst en route to Mengbishan. Commonly seen as we traveled from Tangjiahe to Chengdu.

 

Light-­©\vented Bulbul -­©\ Pycnonotus sinensis sinensis: Common in the lowlands. One was seen at Luding. A few were noted whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Good numbers were seen around Chengdu.

 

Black Bulbul -­©\ Hypsipetes leucocephalus: Commonly seen in Chengdu and around Longcanggou. One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong.


 

PASSERIFORMES: Regulidae

 

Goldcrest -­©\ Regulus regulus yunnanensis: One was seen briefly (with another heard) at Mengbishan. A few were seen or heard at Gongangling Forest. In Qinghai two were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Pnoepygidae

 

Pygmy (Wren-­©\Babbler) Cupwing -­©\ Pnoepyga pusilla pusilla: A few were heard at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Cettiidae

 

Rufous-­©\faced Warbler -­©\ Abroscopus albogularis fulvifacies: Two less than obliging birds were seen at Tangjiahe. Several were heard at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

Brownish-­©\flanked Bush Warbler -­©\ Horornis fortipes davidianus: Very common by voice (with a couple seen) at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe.

 

Yellow-­©\bellied Bush Warbler -­©\ Horornis acanthizoides acanthizoides: Heard a few times at Longcanggou. One responsive bird was seen quite well at Balangshan. A few were heard at Tangjiahe.

 

Aberrant Bush Warbler -­©\ Horornis flavolivaceus intricatus: Very common by voice (with many seen) at Longcanggou.

 

PASSERIFORMES: Phylloscopidae

 

Buff-­©\throated Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus subaffinis: Two were seen at Longcanggou. Two were noted at Erlangshan. In Qinghai one was seen at Yao Xigou. Regional endemic.

 

Alpine Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus occisinensis: A few were seen at Balangshan, Mengbishan, the Tibetan Plateau and Baxi Forest. In Qinghai one was seen near Qinghai Lake.

 

Yellow-­©\streaked Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus armandii armandii: Three were seen very well at Erlangshan. At least four were seen and heard at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai at least four were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Buff-­©\barred Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus pulcher pulcher: One was seen at Longcanggou. This small white-­©\tailed warbler was commonly seen and heard at Balangshan,


Mengbishan and Baxi Forest.

 

Ashy-­©\throated Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus maculipennis maculipennis: Heard at Longcanggou.

 

Pallas¡¯s Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus proregulus: Two singles were seen at Longcanggou. Two were noted at Baxi Forest.

 

Gansu Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus kansuensis: In Qinghai at least four were seen or heard at Yao Xigou. Endemic.

 

 

The endemic Gansu Leaf Warbler -­©\ just one of many lovely Phylloscopus warblers seen on this trip! We do love them¡­ don¡¯t we.

 

Sichuan Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus forresti: Commonly seen and heard at Longcanggou, Erlangshan, Balangshan, Mengbishan and Tangjiahe.

 

Chinese Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus yunnanensis: Commonly heard and seen at Longcanggou. Breeding endemic.

 

Hume¡¯s Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus humei mandellii: One was noted at Longcanggou. One was seen near Hongyuan. Two were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai this warbler was commonly seen or heard at Yao Xigou.


 

Greenish Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus trochiloides: A few were seen at Erlangshan. Commonly seen at Balangshan. Two were noted at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai two were seen north of Qinghai Lake.

 

Large-­©\billed Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus magnirostris: Commonly heard, with a few seen, at Longcanggou. Heard at Erlangshan and at Baxi Forest and commonly heard or seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Eastern Crowned Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus coronatus: A singing bird was seen at Erlangshan.

 

Blyth¡¯s Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus reguloides assamensis: A few were seen or heard at Longcanggou, Erlangshan and Mengbishan.

 

Claudia¡¯s Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus claudiae: A few were heard and seen very well at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe.

 

Emei Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus emeiensis: A few were seen and heard at Longcanggou. Endemic

 

Kloss¡¯s Leaf Warbler -­©\ Phylloscopus ogilviegranti: Five were seen at Erlangshan. At least two were noted at Balangshan.

 

Grey-­©\crowned Warbler -­©\ Seicercus tephrocephalus: One was seen and heard at Erlangshan.

 

Plain-­©\tailed (Alström¡¯s) Warbler -­©\ Seicercus soror: One was seen and heard at Erlangshan. Endemic breeder

 

Martens¡¯s Warbler -­©\ Seicercus omeiensis: A few were seen and heard at the higher reaches of Longcanggou. Endemic

 

Bianchi¡¯s Warbler -­©\ Seicercus valentine: Just a single bird was seen at Balangshan, but commonly seen and heard at Tangjiahe.

 

Chestnut-­©\crowned Warbler -­©\ Seicercus castaniceps sinensis: One was seen at Longcanggou and three were seen very nicely at Tangjiahe.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Locustellidae

 

Brown Bush Warbler -­©\ Locustella luteoventris: Heard and seen reasonably well at Longcanggou.


Spotted Bush Warbler -­©\ Locustella thoracica: In Qinghai a singing bird gave great views at Yao Xigou.

 

Sichuan Bush Warbler -­©\ Locustella chengi: A singing bird was eventually seen quite well (out of three heard) at Longcanggou. Breeding endemic.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Cisticolidae

 

Plain Prinia -­©\ Prinia inornata extensicauda: Heard by Sissi in riverside vegetation whilst en route from Luding to Wolong.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Paradoxornithidae

 

Golden-­©\breasted Fulvetta -­©\ Lioparus chrysotis swinhoii: Several were seen at Longcanggou. A group of four birds was seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Rufous-­©\tailed Babbler -­©\ Chrysomma poecilotis: We had nice looks at a singing lower down bird at Erlangshan. Endemic

 

Chinese Fulvetta -­©\ Fulvetta striaticollis: We had great looks at a pair at Mengbishan. Endemic

 

White-­©\browed Fulvetta -­©\ Fulvetta vinipectus bieti: Five were seen at Erlangshan.

 

Grey-­©\hooded Fulvetta -­©\ Fulvetta cinereiceps: Several were seen at Longcanggou. Two were seen at Erlangshan. A single bird was seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Great Parrotbill -­©\ Conostoma aemodium: Two of these impressive birds were seen at Longcanggou. Heard at Tangjiahe.

 

Brown Parrotbill -­©\ Cholornis unicolor: Heard only at Tangjiahe.

 

Three-­©\toed Parrotbill -­©\ Cholornis paradoxa: Heard distantly at Longcanggou.

 

Vinous-­©\throated Parrotbill -­©\ Sinosuthora webbiana suffusa: A few were seen at Tangjiahe and in Chengdu.

 

Ashy-­©\throated Parrotbill -­©\ Sinosuthora alphonsiana alphonsiana: A single bird was seen at Longanggou.

 

Grey-­©\hooded Parrotbill -­©\ Sinosuthora zappeyi zappeyi: A pair gave nice views at Longcanggou. Regional endemic. Vulnerable.


Golden Parrotbill -­©\ Suthora verreauxi verreauxi: We had great views at Longcanggou.

 

This stunning Golden Parrotbill was a real crowd-­©\pleaser¡­

 

PASSERIFORMES: Zosteropidae

 

White-­©\collared Yuhina -­©\ Yuhina diademata diademata: Commonly seen at Longcanggou and Erlangshan. Up to eight were noted at Balangshan and two were seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Chestnut-­©\flanked White-­©\Eye -­©\ Zosterops erythropleurus: Singles were seen at Longcanggou and Tangjiahe.

 

Japanese White-­©\Eye -­©\ Zosterops japonicas simplex: Seen at Longcanggou and Erlangshan.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Timaliidae

 

Rufous-­©\capped Babbler -­©\ Stachyridopsis ruficeps davidi: One gave reasonable views at Longcanggou.


Streak-­©\breasted Scimitar Babbler -­©\ Pomatorhinus ruficollis reconditus: One was seen at Longcanggou. Heard once at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

Black-­©\streaked Scimitar Babbler -­©\ Pomatorhinus gravivox: Several vocal birds gave brief glimpses at Erlangshan.

 

PASSERIFORMES: Leiothrichidae

David¡¯s Fulvetta -­©\ Alcippe davidi davidi: Two were seen at Longcanggou.

Spotted Laughingthrush -­©\ Ianthocincla ocellata artemisiae: Two were seen by some of the group at Tangjiahe.

 

Giant Laughingthrush -­©\ Ianthocincla maximus: Commonly Heard, with a few seen, at Balangshan and Mengbishan. in the Baxi area. Endemic.

 

Buffy Laughingthrush -­©\ Ianthocincla berthemyi: We had great looks at one (with another calling nearby) whilst at Longcanggou.

 

Per David¡¯s (Plain) Laughingthrush -­©\ Ianthocincla davidi concolor: Two were seen in scrub north of Hongyuan. In Qinghai one was seen at Beishan near Xining.

Endemic

 

White-­©\browed Laughingthrush -­©\ Ianthocincla sannio oblectans: Three were seen at Longcanggou. One was seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Commonly seen in Chengdu.

 

Chinese Babax -­©\ Ianthocincla lanceolata bonvaloti: A couple of vocal parties were seen at Erlangshan.

 

Elliot¡¯s Laughingthrush -­©\ Trochalopteron elliotii: Common and widespread ¨C seen or heard at most sites. Endemic

Black-­©\faced Laughingthrush -­©\ Trochalopteron affine blythii: Heard only on one occasion at Tangjiahe.

 

Red-­©\winged Laughingthrush -­©\ Trochalopteron formosum formosum: Heard only at Longcanggou.

 

Red-­©\billed Leiothrix -­©\ Leiothrix lutea lutea: A few were seen at Longcanggou. A single bird was seen at Tangjiahe. Small numbers were noted at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

Red-­©\tailed Minla -­©\ Minla ignotincta jerdoni: Two singles were seen at Longcanggou. Grey-­©\faced (Emei Shan) Liocichla -­©\ Liocichla omeiensis: A pair was seen, with


others heard, at Longcanggou. Endemic. Vulnerable.

 

Blue-­©\winged Minla -­©\ Minla cyanouroptera wingatei: A few were seen in the flocks at Longcanggou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Muscicapidae

 

Dark-­©\sided Flycatcher -­©\ Muscicapa sibirica rothschildi: One was seen at Longcanggou.

 

Ferruginous Flycatcher -­©\ Muscicapa ferruginea: A few were seen at Longcanggou and a single bird was seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Brown-­©\breasted Flycatcher -­©\ Muscicapa muttui: A single bird was seen near Longcanggou.

 

Oriental Magpie-­©\Robin -­©\ Copsychus saularis prosthopellus: Two were seen near Chengdu. Four were seen at the Chengdu Panda Center.

 

Blue-­©\throated (Chinese) Blue-­©\Flycatcher ¨C Cyornis rubeculoides glaucicomans: Heard only at Longcanggou.

 

Verditer Flycatcher -­©\ Eumyias thalassinus: Small numbers were seen at Longcanggou.

 

Indian Blue Robin -­©\ Larvivora brunnea brunnea: Heard only at Tangjiahe, where not uncommon.

 

White-­©\bellied Redstart -­©\ Luscinia phoenicuroides ichangensis: In Qinghai a male was seen after considerable effort at Yao Xigou.

Blue Whistling Thrush -­©\ Myophonus caeruleus temminckii: A few were seen from the bus or at roadside stops at scattered sites, including Tangjiahe.

Little Forktail -­©\ Enicurus scouleri: One was flushed from the road at Tangjiahe.

 

Firethroat -­©\ Calliope pectardens: This highly anticipated jewel was seen on two occasions at Erlangshan ¨C a pair followed by a single vocal male. Another was heard at Balangshan. Near-­©\threatened.


 

 

This male Firethroat glowed in the undergrowth at Erlangshan.

 

Siberian Rubythroat -­©\ Calliope calliope beicki: In Qinghai at least eight was noted at Yao Xigou, with several singing males offering great views.

 

Chinese Rubythroat -­©\ Calliope tschebaiewi: We had great looks at a singing male at Balangshan. This species has very recently been split off from White-­©\tailed Rubythroat.

 

Grandala -­©\ Grandala coelicolor: We obtained some great looks either side of the pass at Balangshan.

 

Himalayan Bluetail -­©\ Tarsiger rufilatus: Several were seen at Balangshan. Two were seen at Gongangling. In Qinghai a female was seen at Yao Xigou.

 

White-­©\browed Bush-­©\Robin -­©\ Tarsiger indicus: A few were seen and heard at Tangjiahe.

 

Golden Bush-­©\Robin -­©\ Tarsiger chrysaeus chrysaeus: A pair of these beautiful birds was seen well at Erlangshan and a male showed well at Balangshan.

 

Slaty-­©\backed Flycatcher -­©\ Ficedula hodgsonii: A smart looking male was seen at Balangshan. Two singing immature males were studied at Baxi Forest. Seen and


heard at Gongangling

 

Rufous-­©\gorgeted Flycatcher -­©\ Ficedula strophiata strophiata: A few were seen at Longcanggou.

 

Slaty-­©\blue Flycatcher -­©\ Ficedula tricolor diversa: One was seen at Longcanggou.

 

Blue-­©\fronted Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus frontalis: Two were seen at Erlangshan Up to eight were seen at Balangshan.

 

Plumbeous Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus fuliginosus fuliginosus: Five were seen near Longcanggou. Three were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Two were seen at Baxi Forest. Commonly seen at Tangjiahe.

 

White-­©\capped Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus leucocephalus: A few were seen in the gloom at Balangshan. A few were noted along the rivers as we traveled.

 

Hodgson¡¯s Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus hodgsoni: A pair was seen at Wori. In Qinghai a pair was seen attending a nest at Beishan near Xining. Breeding endemic.

 

White-­©\throated Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus schisticeps: A couple of pairs were seen at Balangshan. A few were seen at Mengbishan. Two were seen at Baxi Forest. Two were seen at Gongangling Pass. In Qinghai six were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

White-­©\winged Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus erythrogastrus: In Qinghai a fine male was at the pass seen west of Qinghai Lake.

 

(Eastern) Black Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus ochruros rufiventris: Commonly seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai a male was seen at Beishan near Xining. In Qinghai a few were seen around Qinghai Lake.

 

Daurian Redstart -­©\ Phoenicurus auroreus leucopterus: At least six were noted at Erlangshan. Two were seen at Wori. Two were seen at Baxi Forest. A pair was seen as we traveled from Tangjiahe to Chengdu.

 

Blue Rock-­©\Thrush -­©\ Monticola solitaries pandoo: One was seen whilst en route to Luding. Four were noted at Wori. Singles were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai and between Tangjiahe and Chengdu.

 

Siberian Stonechat -­©\ Saxicola maurus przewalskii: There were a few singles recorded at scattered upland sites in Sichuan and Qinghai.

 

Grey Bush Chat -­©\ Saxicola ferreus: Two singles were seen from the bus close to Luding and a pair was seen at Tangjiahe.

 

Pied Wheatear -­©\ Oenanthe pleschanka: Two Qinghai at least four was seen at


Beishan, near Xining.

 

Desert Wheatear -­©\ Oenanthe deserti: In Qinghai a male was seen by DAGRO near Chaka.

 

Isabelline Wheatear -­©\ Oenanthe isabellina: In Qinghai this bird was commonly encountered in the deserts around Chaka. Many individuals were seen in song flight.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Turdidae

 

Siberian Thrush ¨C Geokichla sibirica: Martin S got good looks at a female at Gongangling Forest. Sadly, it could not be relocated¡­

 

Long-­©\tailed Thrush -­©\ Zoothera dixoni: One was seen quite well at Gongangling Forest.

 

Sichuan Thrush -­©\ Zoothera griseiceps: A thrush possibly of this species was seen at Gongangling Forest.

 

Scaly Thrush -­©\ Zoothera dauma: One was seen briefly at Balangshan.

 

Chinese Blackbird -­©\ Turdus mandarinus: One was seen at Longcanggou. Two were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong and a few were seen in Chengdu.

Recently split by the IOC.

 

Chestnut Thrush -­©\ Turdus rubrocanus gouldii: A few of these lovely thrushes were seen at Erlangshan. Commonly seen at Balangshan and at Gonggangling Forest. In Qinghai a few were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

White-­©\backed (Kessler¡¯s) Thrush -­©\ Turdus kessleri: Three were seen at Mengbishan. Found to be rather common on the Tibetan plateau with at least 30 seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. Also, commonly seen at Baxi Forest.

Breeding endemic.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Sturnidae

 

Red-­©\billed Starling -­©\ Spodiopsar sericeus: A flock of six was seen very well at Balangshan and a few were noted as we traveled from Tangjiahe to Chengdu.

 

White-­©\cheeked Starling -­©\ Spodiopsar cineraceus: Two were seen in the grounds of our hotel in Tangjiahe.

 

Crested Myna -­©\ Acridotheres cristatellus cristatellus: Common in the Sichuan lowlands, where often seen along roadsides. In Qinghai one was seen whilst en route


from Qinghai Lake to Xining.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Dicaeidae

Fire-­©\breasted Flowerpecker -­©\ Dicaeum ignipectus ignipectus: Heard a couple of times at Longcanggou. Lijiang.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Nectariniidae

 

Mrs. Gould¡¯s Sunbird -­©\ Aethopyga gouldiae dabryii: Common. A few were seen at Longcanggou, Erlangshan, Balangshan and Tangjiahe.

 

 

It¡¯s always a good day when you see the immaculate Mrs. Gould¡¯s Sunbird!

 

PASSERIFORMES: Prunellidae

 

Alpine Accentor -­©\ Prunella collaris nipalensis: Four were seen at close range just below the snow line at Balangshan.

 

Robin Accentor -­©\ Prunella rubeculoides nipalensis: In Qinghai a few were seen west of Qinghai Lake.


 

Rufous-­©\breasted Accentor -­©\ Prunella strophiata strophiata: A few were seen at Balangshan and Mengbishan and a single bird was noted at Gongangling Forest. In Qinghai two were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Brown Accentor -­©\ Prunella fulvescens: In Qinghai one was seen (with another heard) in low scrub in the sand dunes at the east end of Qinghai Lake.

 

Maroon-­©\backed Accentor -­©\ Prunella immaculate: One was seen at Mengbishan, but was retiring and not seen by all, unfortunately.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Motacillidae

 

Citrine (Tibetan) Wagtail -­©\ Motacilla citreola calcarata: Six were seen at Erlangshan and a few were seen on the Tibetan Plateau. The black-­©\backed male is a particularly beautiful wagtail.

 

Grey Wagtail -­©\ Motacilla cinerea: Commonly seen at Longcanggou, Erlangshan, Balangshan and Baxi Forest.

 

White (Himalayan) Wagtail -­©\ Motacilla alba alboides: Widespread along rivers. A few were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong, Mengbishan, on the Tibetan plateau and around Chendu. In Qinghai four were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

White (Amur) Wagtail -­©\ Motacilla alba leucopsis: In Qinghai four were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Blyth¡¯s Pipit -­©\ Anthus godlewskii: One was seen briefly at Balangshan.

 

Upland Pipit -­©\ Anthus sylvanus: One was studied at length at the pass at Mengbishan.

 

Rosy Pipit -­©\ Anthus roseatus: Several birds (including some in song flight) gave nice looks whilst at Erlangshan. Commonly seen at Balangshan. A few were seen at Mengbishan and on the Tibetan plateau.

 

Olive-­©\backed Pipit -­©\ Anthus hodgsoni: Three were seen at Erlangshan. A few were seen at Balangshan. Two were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai.

 

Water Pipit -­©\ Anthus spinoletta: In Qinghai at least four birds were seen at Qinghai Lake, including one carrying nest material.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Urocynchramidae

 

Przevalski¡¯s Pinktail -­©\ Urocynchramus pylzowi: We had great looks at four birds


(after some effort) in hillside scrub near Ruoergai. In Qinghai heard distantly at a known site in the Rubber Mountains. Endemic

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Emberizidae

 

Slaty Bunting -­©\ Emberiza siemsseni: A pair was seen by most of the group at Tangjiahe. Endemic

 

Godlewski¡¯s Bunting -­©\ Emberiza godlewskii omissa: A few were seen at Baxi Forest. In Qinghai several birds of the form khamensis were seen at Beishan, near Xining.

 

Meadow Bunting -­©\ Emberiza cioides: In Qinghai four or more birds (including singing males) were seen at Beishan, near Xining. This included a pair carrying nest material.

 

Yellow-­©\throated Bunting -­©\ Emberiza elegans elegantula: Two of these flashy buntings were seen near Longcanggou and three were noted at Erlangshan.

 

Black-­©\faced Bunting -­©\ Emberiza spodocephala sordida: A smart-­©\looking singing male was seen very well whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. Two were seen as we traveled to Tangjiahe. In Qinghai two were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

 

PASSERIFORMES: Fringillidae

 

Plain Mountain Finch -­©\ Leucosticte nemoricola nemoricola: Small numbers were seen around Balangshan. In Qinghai one was seen at the pass in the Rubber Mountains.

 

Brandt¡¯s Mountain Finch -­©\ Leucosticte brandti: Some large flocks entertained us in the higher reaches of Balangshan.

 

Crimson-­©\browed Finch -­©\ Pinicola subhimachalus: Three (including a singing immature male) were seen at Mengbishan, offering close studies.

 

Grey-­©\headed Bullfinch -­©\ Pyrrhula erythaca: We had great looks at this attractive finch at Erlangshan. One was seen at Balangshan. One was seen at Gongangling Forest near Jiuzhaigou. In Qinghai four were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Dark-­©\breasted Rosefinch -­©\ Procarduelis nipalensis nipalensis: A few of these attractive finches were seen near the tunnel at Balangshan.

 

Common Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus erythrinus roseatus: A few were seen at Balangshan. A male was seen north of Hongyuan.


Himalayan Beautiful Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus pulcherrimus argyrophrys: A pair was seen at a stop whilst en route to Hongyuan. In Qinghai, three female-­©\plumaged birds were seen in the Rubber Mountains.

 

Pink-­©\rumped Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus waltoni eos: A flock of 20 was seen at Balangshan and at least 25 were noted at Mengbishan.

 

Vinaceous Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus vinaceus: Several of these attractive birds gave nice looks at Longcanggou.

 

 

We had great looks at Vinaceous Rosefinches at Longcanggou¡­

 

Sharpe¡¯s Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus verreauxii: Three birds (two males and a female) were seen at Erlangshan and a pair was noted at Balangshan.

 

Chinese White-­©\browed Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus dubius femininus: Heard at Erlangshan. A few were seen at Balangshan. Commonly seen at Mengbishan. In Qinghai six were seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Streaked Rosefinch -­©\ Carpodacus rubicilloides rubicilloides: A male was seen below the pass at Mengbishan.

Oriental (Grey-­©\capped) Greenfinch -­©\ Chloris sinica sinica: A few were seen near


Longcanggou. At least ten were seen whilst en route from Luding to Wolong. In Qinghai four were seen at our hotel in Xinging.

 

Red Crossbill -­©\ Loxia curvirostra himalayensis: Heard on a couple of occasions at Mengbishan.

 

Eursian Siskin ¨C Spinus spinus: In Qinghai one was seen briefly seen at Yao Xigou.

 

Twite -­©\ Linaria flavirostris miniakensis: Commonly seen on the Tibetan Plateau between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai a few were seen around Qinghai Lake and Chaka.

 

Tibetan Serin -­©\ Spinus thibetanus: Two were seen at Baxi Forest. One was seen briefly at Gongangling Forest near Jiuzhaigou.

 

Collared Grosbeak -­©\ Mycerobas affinis: Three of these lovely grosbeaks were seen very well at Balangshan. Heard at Mengbishan.

 

White-­©\winged Grosbeak -­©\ Mycerobas carnipes: Six were seen at Erlangshan. Three were seen at Baxi Forest.

 

PASSERIFORMES: Passeridae

 

Russet Sparrow -­©\ Passer rutilans intensior: Three were seen near Longcanggou and two were seen near Luding.

 

Eurasian Tree Sparrow -­©\ Passer montanus tibetanus: Commonly seen throughout.

 

Rock Sparrow -­©\ Petronia petronia brevirostris: In Qinghai a few were seen at Qinghai Lake.

 

Tibetan (Black-­©\winged) Snowfinch -­©\ Montifringilla adamsi: In Qinghai a few were seen at the Rubber Mountains pass west of Qinghai Lake.

 

Henri¡¯s Snowfinch -­©\ Montifringilla henrici: In Qinghai a few were seen west of Qinghai Lake.

 

White-­©\rumped Snowfinch -­©\ Montifringilla taczanowskii: Four were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai two were seen at the Rubber Mountains pass.

Per David¡¯s (Small) Snowfinch -­©\ Montifringilla davidiana: In Qinghai we eventually had great views of a pair near Chaka.

Rufous-­©\necked Snowfinch -­©\ Montifringilla ruficollis isabellina: Two were seen between Hongyuan and Ruoergai. In Qinghai a few were seen around Qinghai Lake.